Volume # 0

Spring 2016(5776) 5776

In this issue
RABBANIT SHULAMIT MELAMED
People

RABBANIT SHULAMIT MELAMED

One of the most successful and innovative women in Israel, Rabbanit Shulamit Melamed is the current founding head of the popular Religious Zionist news network Arutz Sheva (israelnationalnews.com).

Saved by Shabbat: How to Put Media Messages in Proper Perspective
Opinion

Saved by Shabbat: How to Put Media Messages in Proper Perspective

Why do Americans feel so bad when, by every meaningful measure, we have it so good?
That’s the question that troubles me every evening as I head home from work. As host of a daily radio talk show that reaches more than four million listeners across the country, I’m exposed to a steady stream of self-pity and complaint.

Kosher Cookbooks: Retracing our History through Recipes
Food

Kosher Cookbooks: Retracing our History through Recipes

When Eli Genauer reads an old cookbook, it’s not for the recipes. Like a detective on the hunt, Genauer searches cover to cover for clues of a time long passed and for insights that can be gleaned from them. Advertisements for the Ice Delivery Company (for icebox use) or for the North Pacific Railway in The Neighborhood Cook Book (Portland, 1912) are the kinds of historical traces that interest him.

Celebrity Kosher Chefs
Food

Celebrity Kosher Chefs

Stardom and the rise of the “celebrity chef” have created a place for chefs in modern society on par with the likes of sports personalities and actors. That visibility has impacted the kosher world as well. Today, modern kosher cookbook authors are receiving their own celebrated status.

Unbroken Faith: American Jewish Families Who Defied the Odds
History

Unbroken Faith: American Jewish Families Who Defied the Odds

Many assume Torah Judaism came to these shores in the aftermath of the Holocaust. This is not only historically false, but it overlooks the extraordinary mesirut nefesh and devotion to Torah exhibited by hundreds of men and women who stubbornly and courageously fought to lay the foundation of Torah Judaism in America.

The Bienenfeld Family, New York
History

The Bienenfeld Family, New York

I’m named after Jacob, my grandfather, who was named after Yaakov Bienenfeld, the patriarch of this family and my great-great-grandfather who came to the US in the 1840s. When he first came to New York, he settled in Harlem, where a Jewish community existed at the time. Many of the big churches in Harlem today used to be shuls. Additionally, most of the big shuls in Manhattan today were built in the 1800s, such as the West Side Institutional Synagogue, Congregation Ohab Zedek, Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun and Congregation Shearith Israel (the Spanish & Portuguese Synagogue).

The Hartman Family, New York
History

The Hartman Family, New York

When I was growing up, small farms still existed in Boro Park. I remember there were goats and chickens. It was a time when the majority of Jewish immigrants assimilated. Observant Judaism was perceived as being old fashioned, a relic from the Old Country.

Scheinerman Family, Washington, DC; New York
History

Scheinerman Family, Washington, DC; New York

When my parents, Peretz and Annie Scheinerman, lived in Washington, DC [in the early part of the twentieth century], you could just walk onto the White House grounds. There were these beautiful green rolling hills where my brothers and their friends used to play ball.

The Bruder Family, New York
History

The Bruder Family, New York

Many of the books on the history of American Orthodoxy include the names Bruder, Weberman, Fensterheim and Jacobs. These families helped build the spiritual foundation that enabled American Orthodoxy to flourish decades later.